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Full text of "The North Carolina Symphony teachers handbook .."

Teachers Handbook 

1985-1986 Season 



NORTH CAROLINA SYMPHONY 

TEACHERS HANDBOOK 

1985-86 

JACKSON PARKHURST, EDITOR 

**************************************** 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 



THE YOUNG PERSON'S GUIDE TO THE ORCHESTRA 

THEME 

FUGUE 
Classroom Activities by Melissa Raley 

SYMPHONY NO. 4 IN E MINOR, OP. 98 
THIRD MOVEMENT: ALLEGRO GIOCOSO 
Classroom Activities by Janet Schwarze 

MASQUERADE 

"MAZURKA" 

"GALOP" 
Classroom Activities by Pell Foster, 
Jan Browning, Antoinette Battle and 
Joyce Haney 

SYMPHONY NO. 39 in E-FLAT MAJOR, K. 543 

FOURTH MOVEMENT: ALLEGRO 
Classroom Activities by Barbara T. Flood 

SCHEHERAZADE 

FOURTH MOVEMENT: FESTIVAL AT BAGHDAD; 
THE SEA; THE SHIP IS WRECKED ON A 
ROCK SURMOUNTED BY A BRONZE WARRIOR 

Classroom Activities by Eleanor Nesbitt 

The Songs 

Biographies 

Notes 



BENJAMIN BRITTEN 



JOHANNES BRAHMS 



ARAM KHACHATURIAN 



WOLFGANG A. MOZART 



NICHOLAS RIMSKY-KORSAKOV 



14 



18 



24 



30 

30 
31 



**************************************** 



North Carolina Symphony Teachers Handbook Copyright © 1985 by The North 
Carolina Symphony Society, Inc. Reproduction of this book in its entirety is 
strictly forbidden. Permission is given to duplicate charts, scores, puzzles, 
etc. for classroom use only. 

The Young Person's Guide to the Orchestra by Benjamin Britten (c) Copyright 
1946 by Hawkes and Son (London) Ltd.; Renewed 1973 
Reprinted by permission of Boosey and Hawkes, Inc. 

North Carolina Symphony Post Office Box 28026 Raleigh, North Carolina 27611 

Jackson Parkhurst, Director of Education 



NOTES 



1985-86 CHILDREN'S CONCERT PROGRAM 



BENJAMIN BRITTEN (1913-1976) 



THE YOUNG PERSON'S GUIDE TO THE ORCHESTRA 
THEME 
FUGUE 



"I belong at home ... I believe in roots, in associations, in 
backgrounds, in personal relationships ... I want my music to 
be of use to people, to please them, to enhance their lives . . . 
I believe that an artist should be part of his community, should 
work for it, with it, and be used by it . . ." 

If there is one work by Benjamin Britten that best typifies this belief, 
it is The Young Person's Guide. It is a superb teaching piece in that it takes 
the orchestra apart and puts it back together for us, showing all its elements, 
in just over twenty minutes. But it is more. It is a work of art that 
lovingly pays homage to Purcell and a tradition of music that Britten held 
dear. It is also a twentieth century masterpiece which can stand alone on any 
concert pro-gram under its other title, Variations and Fugue on a Theme by 
Purcell . It is beautiful and compelling music, and there are few orchestral 
finales that are superior for brilliance and excitement. 

The Young Person' s Guide is scored for piccolo, 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 
clarinets, 2 bassoons, 4 horns, 2 trumpets, 3 trombones, tuba, timpani, per- 
cussion, harp, and strings. 



CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES 



BY MELISSA RALEY 



Considered by many as Britten's most popular orchestral work, The Young 
Person' s Guide to the Orchestra provides "pleasure to amateurs, however young, 
while challenging their listening skills." To music educators, this piece of- 
fers an excellent opportunity to enhance our student's knowledge of the orchestra. 
Young listeners of all ages are given the opportunity to meet the instruments 
playing as members of the full orchestra, as members of a family, and as indivi- 
duals. 



The Young Person' s Guide was composed in 1945 as the score for the docu- 
mentary film entitled Instruments of the Orchestra . The theme is based on a 
dance tune from the stage play Abdelazer , or The Moor' s Revenge , by another 
English composer, Henry Purcell (1659-1695). 

This composition is divided into two main sections - theme and variation, 
and fugue. Our performance will omit the variations. The opening statement of 
the theme is played by the full orchestra, followed by statements of the theme 
featuring each family - (1) Woodwinds (2) Brass (3) Strings (4) Percussion. 
The entire orchestra then restates Purcell 's theme. Thirteen variations follow, 
highlighting individual instruments. 



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After dissecting the orchestra, Britten's Fugue gradually restores the 
orchestra to a full unified body. A fugue is very similar to a round or canon. 
A short melody or "subject" is introduced at the beginning and then is repeated 
over and over as other instruments imitate the subject. In Britten's Fugue, the 
subject is heard sixteen times as each instrument joins the celebration. 
Entrances are made in the following order: 



1. Piccolo 

2. Flute 

3 . Oboe 

4 . Clarinet 

5. Bassoon 

6. 1st Violins 

7. 2nd Violins 

8. Violas 



9. Cellos 

10. Double Basses 

11. Harp 

12. French Horns 

13 . Trumpets 

14. Trombones and Tuba 

15. Percussion 

16. All instruments excluding Brass 



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Once all entrances have been made, the brasses return to Purcell's theme while 
the remainder of the orchestra continues Britten's Fugue. 

HIGHLIGHTS OF BENJAMIN BRITTEN'S LIFE 

Did you know that Benjamin Britten. . . 

. . .was born on November 22, 1913, in Lowestoft, England, to a dental surgeon 

and an amateur singer. 

. . .started composing at age 4, piano lessons at age 7, and viola lessons at 
age 10. 

. . .revealed such a remarkable childhood gift for music that Britten was often 
compared to Mozart. 

. . .composed an oratorio and six string quartets before the age of 12, and by 
the age of 14, Britten had 100 opus numbers to his credit. 

. . .studied music with Frank Bridge and later at the Royal College of Music. 

. . .was a well-known composer, conductor, and pianist; but was best known for 
hi3 vocal music, especially opera - most important of which are Peter 
Grimeg (1945) , Billy Budd (1951) , Turn of the Screw (1954) , and A 

Midsummer Might' s Dream (1960) . 



. . .is considered to be the most gifted English composer since Purcell. 

. . .died December 4, 1976, at the age of 63, in Adleburgh, England. 

APPROACH I 

This game is designed to help students learn the families of the orchestra 
and instruments belonging in each section. Depending upon the age and 
knowledge of your students , prior instruction about the instruments may be 
desirable. Jam Handy Series, "Once Upon a Sound;" Bowmar Records, "Meet the 
Instruments;" or Instrument Study Prints are good resources. 

WHAT AM I? Instrument Identification Game 

Objective : To identify instruments and families of the orchestra by asking 
YES or NO questions. 

Materials ; Name tags for each instrument of the orchestra, color coded by 
family, one per student. 

Signs for families of instruments - to be placed strategically around the room. 

Procedure : Hang instrument tag on each student's back so that it is an 
"unknown" to the wearer. Students attempt to discover their identity by asking 
each other questions that can be answered only by "yes" or "no." As soon as 
each student has identified the instrument on the tag, pull the tag to the 
front. Locate the area designated for the corresponding family and sit down to 
indicate a completed task. At this point, play the opening section to The 
Young Person' s Guide . Ask each family to stand while their section is 
performing. When groups encounter difficulty, provide additional listening 
experiences that feature individual instruments and families of instruments. 
"Meet the Instruments" from Bowmar Records is a good choice. Then replay The 
Young Person' s Guide. Record the order of what they have heard on the board. 
Listen again to check for accuracy. 

APPROACH II 

I usually play "What Am I?" before this game, because it provides a review 
of the instruments and divides the class into four teams. 

NAME THAT INSTRUMENT A take-off on "Name That Tune" 

Objective : To improve auditory discrimination skills and to earn points by 
correctly identifying instruments of the orchestra by sound. 

Materials : Recorded examples of individual instruments 

Four different rhythm instruments - may be bells of different pitches 

Chalkboard or other place to keep score 

Game host (may be teacher) , scorekeeper, judge (optional) 

Procedure: Divide the class into four equal teams named Strings, Woodwinds, 
Brass, and Percussion. Extra students may be judge, host, or scorekeeper, if 
desired. Line teams up equal distances from a rhythm instrument. Play a 
recorded example of an instrument for contestants to identify. As soon as the 
player at the front of the line can identify the instrument, he runs forward, 



plays his rhythm instrument once and waits to be recognized. It is helpful to 
have a "judge" watch for order of response. The fastest team gives the answer 
when recognized. If the answer is correct, his team is awarded a point; if 
incorrect, the second team responds, and so on. In case of a tie, have players 
whisper response in the host's ear. Teams with correct answers will be awarded 
points. 

To ensure success, set the following rules: (1) Teams will lose points for 
unsportsman-like conduct; (2) The first answer given is the one that must be 
counted; (3) Any contestant "sharing" an answer is eliminated. 

The game can be continued as long as desired. 

APPROACH III 

"FUGUE "TNG ON DOWN THE ROAD 

Objective : To improve student's discriminatory listening skills 

Materials : Roadmap for each student (page 5 ) 

Recording of Britten's fugue 

Procedure : Introduce students to the short melody Britten uses as the 
"subject" for the fugue. This may be done by teaching the following song: 



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Once the students are familiar with the theme, have them listen to Britten's 
fugue counting the number of entrances they hear. Discuss. Distribute 
roadmaps and "talk" through the journey before listening and traveling 
together. During the first listening experience ask questions to make certain 
that all students are at the correct road markers. Gradually diminish teacher 
involvement, guiding "tourists" on a successful journey. 



FUG-UE"IN& OH DOWM THE RDAD 




APPROACH IV 

Objective : To provide students additional and varied listening experiences. 

Materials : Two recordings of The Young Person's Guide , with and without spoken 
commentary. 

Copies of the script. 

Procedure : Share the commentary with the class prior to listening. Lead 
students in a discussion of where the dialogue is most appropriate. Provide 
students with enough listening experiences so that they are able to narrate an 
instrumental version of The Young Person's Guide . Arrange performances with 
student narrators for classes that have not been introduced to the commentary. 

The Young Person's Guide to the Orchestra was originally performed with spoken 
commentary. The following is the commentary written by Eric Crozier for the 
sections to be performed by the North Carolina Symphony. 

To be spoken before the music starts: 

"The composer has written this piece of music to introduce you to the 
instruments of the orchestra. There are four teams of players: the STRINGS, 
the WOODWIND, the BRASS, and the PERCUSSION. Each of these four teams uses 
instruments which have a family likeness. They make roughly the same kind of 
sound in the same way. The STRINGS are played with a bow or plucked by the 
fingers. The WOODWIND are blown by the breath. The BRASS are blown too. The 
PERCUSSION are banged. First you will hear a Theme by the great English 
composer, Henry Purcell, played by the whole orchestra and by each of the four 
groups of instruments." 

To be spoken before the entrances of their respective family: 

"The WOODWIND are superior varieties of the penny-whistle. They are made of 
wood. " 

"The first BRASS instruments were trumpets and hunting-horns. These are their 
modern descendants." 

"The STRINGS, large and small, are scraped with a bow or plucked with the 
fingers. Their cousin the harp is always plucked." 

"The PERCUSSION group includes drums, gongs, tambourines and anything else you 
hit. When you have heard them, the whole orchestra will play the melody 
again. " 

To be spoken before the Fugue: 

"We have taken the whole Orchestra to pieces. . . Now let us put it together in 
a Fugue. The instruments come in one after another, in the same order as 
before - beginning with the Piccolo. At the end, the Brass will play Henry 
Purcell 's fine melody, while the others go on playing Benjamin Britten's 
Fugue . " 



APPROACH V 
Cnstrumental "Seek and Find" Page 7 



Supplemwd-al Activity Shet^r 

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JOHANNES BRAHMS SYMPHONY NO. 4 IN E MINOR, OP. 98 

THIRD MOVEMENT: ALLEGRO GIOCOSO 

"I am in love with music. I love music. I think of nothing but music 
and of other things only when they make music more beautiful to me." 

Contemporary music has always had difficulty finding an audience, and this 
was no less true with the music of Brahms. It is difficult to believe today 
that Brahms' music was ever thought of as "controversial" or " avant garde " , but 
such was the case with Brahms and his Fourth Symphony. Even Brahms' most 
intimate circle of friends and supporters referred to it with terms such as 
"obscure" and "intellectual" when they first heard Brahms and a friend perform 
a two piano arrangement of it in 1885. The most positive statement that one 
friend could muster about the third movement was that it was "unkempt and 
heavily humorous." Brahms was criticized for the inclusion of a part for 
triangle. 

We can only be grateful today that Brahms had enough faith in his work not 
to "take the scherzo with its sudden main theme and banal second thoughts and 
throw it in the wastebasket" as one friend suggested. The symphony has become 
one of the mainstays of the orchestral repertoire, and the excitement and 
rollicking good humor of the third movement never fails to electrify an 
audience. 

The Allegro giocoso is scored for pairs of woodwinds, 4 horns, 2 trumpets, 
triangle, timpani, and strings. 

CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES BY JANET SCHWARZE 

HIGHLIGHTS OF BRAHMS' LIFE 

. . .He was born in Hamburg, Germany, May 7, 1833, the son of a musician who 
played double-bass. 

. . .His father taught him to play the violin, cello, and horn. 

. . .At age 7 he began studying piano. 

. . .Brahms' first important professional appearances were as an accompanist to 
violinist Eduard Remenyi. 

. . .Joseph Joachim sent him to Liszt's residence in Weimar, but Brahms decided 
he did not want to be a part of that group. 

. . .Joachim arranged a meeting between Brahms and Schumann at Dusseldorf and 
wrote an article hailing the 20 year old Brahms as a composer from whom 
the world could expect great choral and orchestral works. 

. . .From 1857-1860 he held the post at the small court to Lippe-Detmold. 

. . .He returned to Hamburg in 1860 hoping for a post there. 

. . .In 1862 he left Hamburg to go to Vienna and finally established his 
residence there. 

. . .Brahms wrote in every musical form but opera. 

. . .He received honorary Doctor degrees from the University of Breslau and the 
'Jr. i versity of Cambridge. 

. . .Brahms died April 3, 1897. 



CHARACTERISTICS OF BRAHMS MUSIC: 

In general: 

1 Brahms was one of the greatest masters of the art of development. 

2. His finest themes are lyrical in character and bear strong resemblance 

to folk song. 

3. One of the most attractive features of his style is rhythmic 

originality. 

4. Beauty of themes, concise development, and perfection in form were more 

important to him than tone color. 

5. His four symphonies did not appear until after 1875 and are the 
culmination of his career as a composer of instrumental music. Each 
one is a masterpiece. 

Fourth Symphony: 

1. This symphony is a classic masterpiece written at the height of the 
revolutionary Romantic era. 

2. Variation technique had become an intrinsic part of Brahms' style when 
he wrote the Fourth. 

3. None of the 4 symphonies has a scherzo for the 3rd movement - the 
Fourth has a classic sonata-allegro form. 

4. The movement tingles with force , laughter , and joy. 

THE THEMES: 

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APPROACH I 

MOTIVATION 

Objective : Learn about the composer and do initial listening to the music. 

Materials : Poster board, student books, map of Germany and Austria, time line 
of musical periods. 

Procedure : 

1. Listen to the recording and let the children share ideas about how it felt 
to them. Encourage them to express general ideas about mood, texture, 
instruments, tempo, meter, dynamics, etc. They may even want to describe a 
scene they imagine. 

2. Begin a collection of descriptive words which will be used later for an art 
and movement activity. These could be written on large cards or a big poster 
to save and add to later. 

3. Another listening may be more teacher directed, pointing out things from the 
list below. 

a. Strength in the mood of this movement. 

b. Allegro giocoso means "fast", "merrily" 

c. Elements of surprise and humor - contrasts from f and ff to p; full 
orchestra to less dense texture. 

d. Touches of color provided by the triangle. 

e. Rhythmic variation of thematic material. 

f. Singing or lyric quality of themes, especially the 4th one. 

g. The form: sonata-allegro. 

4. Learn about the composer, Brahms, from students books and information above. 

a. Find his home town, Hamburg, on a map of Germany and trace his moves to 
Hanover, Weimar, Dusseldorf, Lippe-Detmold, back to Hamburg, and 
finally to Vienna. 

b. Identify important musicians at each location who helped or influenced 
his career. 

c. Look at a time line of music periods and see how Brahms lived during 
the Romantic era, but wrote in the Classical style. He was known as 
one of the three B's. 

APPROACH II 

RECOGNITION 

Objective : Learn to recognize the main themes and understand sonata-allegro 

form. 

Materials : Four 5V'x8" cards per child, percussion score (page 11 ) 

Procedure: 

1. Listen to the themes played on the piano, tap the rhythm patterns, and hum 
or sing along on the neutral syllable "lai" until they know them. 

2. Give each child 4 cards and label them theme I, II, III, IV. 

3. As they listen to the themes, have the children draw a theme contour line 
for each. (e.g. 



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5. From the large percussion score, assign each simple rhythm to percussion 
instruments and explore a possible exposition for sonata-allegro from using the 
rhythms of Brahms' themes. This score only approximates Brahms' music and is 
not meant to be played with the recording, but rather as an example of how 
different themes might be presented in an exposition. 

6. Listen to the recording of the exposition portion of the 3rd movement and 
hold up the correct theme card whenever the theme is heard. (The percussion 
score may guide their listening, but remember it is not a measure by measure 
reproduction. ) 

7. Now go on and listen to the rest of the movement being good detectives. 
Explain that during the development and recapitulation of the movement, the 
composer takes his main ideas and uses them in a variety of ways , so now the 
students will have to listen more carefully to find the ideas in their 
disguises. A large chart of sonata-allegro form will help them keep track of 
what's happening in the music. 

APPROACH III 

EXPLORATION 

Objective : Discover how musical form works through visual art and movement. 

Materials : Descriptive words collection, theme contour cards, art materials of 
your choice. 

Procedure : 

1. Go back to the collection of descriptive words started in Approach I and add 
to it if the children have some new ideas as a result of further activities. 

2. Using their theme contours as a starting point, have the children design a 
visual presentation of the main themes translating feelings of joy, strength, 
etc. with color and using the shape of theme contours to create designs. If 
the children are ready for a more sophisticated art approach, they can plan 
their picture to show clear theme contours on either side, and a free mixture 
and variation of designs in the middle. 

3. Divide the class into 4 groups and assign to each the task of creating a 
movement sequence to one of the themes and also a frozen group shape to match 
the same theme. Again, draw attention to the descriptive words collection to 
stimulate movement ideas. 

4. Finally, perform the movement with the music. Let each theme idea present 
itself clearly, while other groups are frozen in their shape for the 
exposition. Then allow groups to move freely during the development. 

APPROACH IV 

EVALUATION 

Objective : Pencil and paper activities to reinforce learning. 

Materials : Word find puzzle, crossword puzzle, outline map of Germany and 
Austria, and poster board. 

/-.ctivities : 

1 . Do a word find puzzle about Brahms (page 13) . 

2. Do a crossword puzzle about Brahms (page 13). 

3. "op study: chart Brahms' travels and list important events or people at each 
city. 

4. Make a mobile about the composer. Use silhouette shapes of the instruments 
Brahms played 'violin, cello, horn, piano) and list an important event in his 
Life on each . 



13 



ACROSS CLUES 



DOWN CLUES 



5. 
7. 

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10. 

12. 

14. 



Place where Brahms -finally 

settled and made his home? 

City Brahms was born in? 

Brass instrument taught to 

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Large string instrument taught 

to Brahms by h i s -father? 

What was Brahms -father's 

occupat i on? 

Brahms' -first important 

pro-f essi onal appearances 

an ___• 

Name o-f -famous composer to whom 
Brahms was sent but whom Brahms 
rejected? 



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2. 



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At age 7 Brahms began to study 

this keyboard instrument? 

What instrument did Brahms' 

father pi ay? 

Small string instrument taught 

to Brahms by his -father? 

Brahms wrote in almost every -form 

except this one? 

Country Brahms was born in? 

Important composer who helped 

Brahms' career and was a close 

fr i end? 

Though Brahms was writing during 

the romantic period his music is 

clearly in -form. 

Brahms was given honorary Doctors 
degrees -from the Univ. of Breslau. 
and the Univ. of , • 



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14 



ARAM KHACHATURIAN (1903-1978) 



MASQUERADE SUITE 
"MAZURKA" 
"GALOP" 



"It is easier to understand a nation by listening to its music than 
by learning its language." - Anonymous 

The incidental music for the 1940 production of the play Masquerade was 
intended to be nothing more than entertainment for the audience while the sets 
were being changed and also to set the proper mood for the audience. 
Khachaturian' s special gift for orchestration helps assure that goal. 

The Masquerade Suite is scored for pairs of woodwinds, 4 horns, 2 
trumpets, 3 trombones, tuba, percussion, timpani, and strings. 



CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES 



BY PELL FOSTER, JAN BROWNING, 
ANTOINETTE BATTLE, JOYCE HANEY 



HIGHLIGHTS OF KHACHATURIAN ' S LIFE 

. . .Great events occurred in 1903. In Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, the 
Wright Brothers made a successful plane flight, and in Tiflis, Armenia, the 
great Russian composer Aram Khachaturian was born. Armenia is now a part of 
Russia. 

. . .As a youth, Aram showed great love for music. His parents were very poor, 
thus there was no money for music lessons. Aram could only express his 
feelings and talent through the folk music and instruments of Armenia. 

. . .At the age of 20, he did begin to study music. He progressed rapidly. 
Aram attended the Gnessin School of Music in Moscow and the Moscow Conservatory 
of Music. He met his future wife, Nina, at the Conservatory. She was to 
become one of Russia's important women composers. 

. . .Armenian Folk Music was a great influence on Aram's compositions. His 
style included flowing melodies, contrast in mood and tempo, and distinct 
rhythmic patterns . 



. . .Khachaturian taught at the Moscow Conservatory. 
Russian youth group called The Young Pioneers. 



He also worked with a 



. . .His important works include Spartacus , a ballet, Gayne , a ballet suite, 
and Masquerade Suite, an orchestral suite. Gayne included the 1950 's hit, 
"Sabre Dance." 

. . .Aram won many awards for his music even though he was criticized by the 
government during 1948. Composers were told to use folk qualities in their 
works. Aram was doing this, but he apologized anyway. 

. . .Khachaturian visited the United States in 1960. He returned in 1968 to 
conduct his own music. Ten years later, he died in Russia. 



In preparing your students for a study of Khachaturian, we feel that you 
will need to give them a look into the country of Russia. Anything connected 
with Pussia yields mystery. 



15 



Masquerade Suite is a collection of incidental music written for the 
Russian play, Masquerade by Mikhail Lemontov. The play was written in 1835, 
but the censors did not like the ending; therefore, a happy ending was added. 
The male lead is a favorite part of Russian actors. Good versus evil is the 
theme. The aristocratic life is criticized. Although the play is said to be 
light, there is tragedy when the male lead kills his wife. The music which 
Khachaturian wrote was used in the 1938 performance. Masquerade Suite contains 
five compositions: "Waltz", "Nocturne", "Mazurka", "Romance", and "Galop". 

ACTIVITIES FOR "MAZURKA" AND "GALOP" 

...Define "masquerade, balls, ballroom, masks, waltz, nocturne, mazurka, galop, 
suite," etc. Make a collection of masks. Locate Russia on the world map. 
Name composers who are Russian. Make a bulletin board using clippings about 
Russia. Make instrument masks to use in identifying instruments and themes. 

...Body Percussion P = PATSCH S = SNAP C ■ CLAP XP = CROSS OVER PATSCH 



% 
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A- ^Pify\ A - SAW A T&fcUSFEJ^Tfc-bR.UMS 

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TtUHSPg.A. TO ygOoDBuocKS 



TaftU6Pgfl.-To MAfcAcAs 



16 



ACTIVITIES FOR "MAZURKA" 

The mazurka is an 18th century dance from Poland. Accents fall on beats 
2 and 3. As an art form, the "Mazurka" is too fast to dance; however, the 
children created the dance pattern which follows. Listen for these themes: 

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Lummi Stick Routine: P = Point T = Tap C = Click L = Left 

R = Right CT = Close Tap 



Intro: Underarms 2, Twirl 2 



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Last beat, click sticks in air. 



Creative Dance: Form AABBCCBAA 3/4 time. (We did not use the mazurka 
step in this dance.) 

Formation: Single circle facing clockwise. Designate leader. 



17 



Intro.: 4 measures to get ready. Hands on waist for balance. 



A: Measures 1-16 



Measures 
Measures 
Measures 
Measures 



17-18 
1-16 
17-18 
1-16 





Measures 


1-16 


C: 


Measures 


1-8 




Measures 


9-10 




Measures 


1-10 


B: 


Measures 


1-16 


A: 


Measures 


1-18 




Measures 


1-16 




Measures 


17-18 



Beginning with left foot, take 3 small jogging steps 

forward. Hop in place one time, landing on left foot with 

right foot off floor and with right knee bent, and rest in 

this position for two beats. Repeat with right foot, taking 

the jogs. Continue alternating. 

Turn slowly to right and end facing opposite direction, (cc) 

Repeat steps 

Turn to left and end facing center. 

Join hands and do "wave". Begin with leader's left arm. 

Slowly ripple arms individually around the circle and stop 

when "wave" reaches leader's right arm. "Wave" is break 

dance step. 

Repeat 

Stamp L R LRL R L R LRL R 

Turn in place clockwise 1 time 

Repeat 

"Wave" 

Repeat basic steps 

Repeat basic steps 

Turn counter-clockwise and end facing center. Bow and curtsy 



ACTIVITIES FOR "GALOP" 

The Galop is an 18th century dance in 2/4 time. As the children listened to 
this music, they thought of the circus and horses. 

Form: Intro A A B A Bridge C C Solo (clarinet: flute) ABA "with stinger" 

Making a film: After discussion of circus acts, children should draw pictures 
to illustrate. This can be done as a mural or on newsprint. Materials need 
for film: transparency film, magic markers, overhead projector, and projection 
area. Using the first drawing as a guide, use markers and draw the scene onto 
film. Tape film drawings together at sides to show musical form and various 
rhythms. Dialogue can be added in the personage of the "Ringmaster." Move 
drawings across the screen of the overhead while music is playing. 



Creative Movements: 
of music. 



Children can move with circus style movements to sections 



Instrument Masks: 








18 



FILM 




Resources: Conflict: Composer's name was spelled (1) Khachaturian , (2) 
Khatchatourian (3) Khatchaturian . This birthdate was given as 1903 and 1904, 



WOLFGANG AMADEUS MOZART (1756-1791) 



SYMPHONY NO. 39 IN E-FLAT MAJOR, K.543 
FOURTH MOVEMENT: ALLEGRO 



"People make a mistake who think that my art has come easily to me. 
Nobody has devoted so much time and thought to composition as I. 
There is not a famous master whose music I have studied over and 
over." 

The incredible inner resources of Mozart are nowhere more dramatically 
displayed than in the E-Flat Major Symphony. This symphony, plus numbers 40 
and 41 were all written during a six week period in the summer of 1788 when 
things could not have been worse for the Mozart family. Costanze was ill and 
Mozart was miserable and deeply in debt. He was forced to move into cheaper 
housing and wrote a series of heartbreaking letters to his well-to-do merchant 
friend, Michael Puchberg, begging him for yet another loan. But in the midst 
of what would have been defeat for anyone else, Mozart composed his sunny and 
heartwarming 39th symphony. The Finale shows the influence of his friend 
Haydn, and is full of wit, energy, and high spirits. Mozart does not impose 
his problems on us and convinces us that when he composed this work, he must 
have been the happiest of men. 



CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES 



BY BARBARA T. FLOOD 



ANALYSIS OF SYMPHONY NO. 39: 



The orchestration calls for one flute, two clarinets, two bassoons, two 
horns , two trumpets , timpani , and strings . Although the clarinet had been in 
existence for a hundred years before this work was completed, this is the 
first symphony by an important master in which it is assigned a leading role. 
It takes the place of the oboe, and that means it is the principle melodic 
voice of the symphony after the first violins. 



19 



Finale: Allegro , E-Flat major, 2/4 time, Sonata-Allegro form. 

The Finale opens with a jolly tune in the first violins accompanied by the 
second violins which persist for the first eight measures. The movement is 
based entirely on this theme and especially its first nine notes. 



mmm mm 



m 



The theme is repeated forte by the full orchestra. A transition passage 
involving figurative ideas leads to another key (Bb major) and the following 
second theme, which is clearly a variant of the first theme. 



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The first few notes of the theme are tossed about and a new variant, 







concludes the exposition in B-flat major. 

The development, which is very short, is based on the first theme. The 
recapitulation, also based on the first theme and quite short, is more fully 
scored than at the beginning of the movement. The coda ends very suddenly with 
the first few notes of the first theme. 

Objective : The overall objective of this listening experience is to acquaint 
the students with the Finale of Mozart's 39th Symphony. More specifically, the 
aim is to present lasting experiences which will broaden their listening 
skills, their understanding, their enjoyment, and their appreciation for the 
more "serious" music. The primary goal is to prepare the students to listen 
attentively and appreciatively while attending the North Carolina Symphony 
Concert. 

APPROACH I 

To familiarize the students with the music, make charts using the 
following information. Do not include numbers on charts. As the music is 
played, hold up or point to the card at the proper moment in the composition. 
After a few listening sessions, display cards in random order and allow 
students to arrange them in the proper order. The number of lessons required 
for this phase of the activity will depend on your student's abilities. As a 
result of this first experience, the children should be ready for Approach II. 



zo 



z 



EXPOSITION 
VIOLINS PLAY THEME 



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FULL ORCHESTRA 
REPEATS THEME 



THEME II PLAYED BY VIOLINS 



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NEW MELODY IN FLUTES 



DEVELOPMENT 



DRASTIC MODULATIONS 



RETURN TO THEME I 
(played softly) 



FULL ORCHESTRA 



TRANSITION PASSAGE 



FIGURATIVE IDEAS 



MODULATION TO NEW KEY 



VARIANT OF THEME I TOSSED 
ABOUT BETWEEN SECTIONS 



b 



s/iouaA f 



W^m^^ m 



NEW MELODY PLAYED BY CLARINETS 



RECAPITULATION 



THEME I RESTATED WITH 
FULLER ORCHESTRATION 



THEME II NEW KEY BUT 
SCORED AS IN EXPOSITION 



CODA 



ABRUPT ENDING 

WITH THE FIRST 

FEW NOTES OF THEME I 



21 



SYMPHONY 




ACROSS CLUES 



DOWN CLUES 



1. Composer of Symphony in E Flat, No. 39 

3. Composition for orchestra 

5. A brief musical idea. 

8. Phrase or section ending a movement 

9. Part to support or enrich the melody 
11. Building up of thematic material 

after theme is presented 

14. High pitched woodwind 

15. At a walking tempo, moderately 

17. Person who writes music 

18. Last movement of a symphony 

19. Overall plan of a composition 



1. Process of changing from one key to another 

2. Instrument of the percussion family 
4. Major section of a symphony 

6. Speed at which music is played 

7. Restatement of exposition 
10. Single reed instrument 

12. Highest pitched string instrument 

13. First section of Sonata-Allegro Form 

15. Quick, fast, lively 

16. Loud 



22 



SYMPHONY SCRAMBLE 



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THERE ARE 22 WORDS HERE - CAN 
YOU FIND THEM? 

HERE ARE THE WORDS TO LOOK FOR: 



ACCOMPANIMENT 

ANDANTE 

CODA 

DEVELOPMENT 

FINALE 

FORM 

MODULATION 

MOVEMENT 

RECAPITULATION 

TEMPO 

TYMPANI 



ALLEGRO 

CLARINET 

COMPOSER 

EXPOSITION 

FLUTE 

FORTE 

MOTIVE 

MOZART 

SYMPHONY 

THEME 

VIOLIN 



A N S 



E R S 



SYMPHONY 



SYMPHONY SCRAMBLE 




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23 



Name 



Skill: Music appreciation 



/Mj. Listening to Music ^.i; 



1. Today we are listening to 



2. The music was written by 



3. Some instruments I can hear are 



4. This music makes me feel 



5. As I listen, I see this picture in my mind, 



i- " 



24 



APPROACH II 

Students will need to be very familiar with the music before doing this 
activity. Divide the class into small groups. You will need at least three 
groups, one to represent the theme and one for each of its variants. Within 
each group, assign some students the accompaniment and others the theme to 
allow for more varied movements. If you prefer, the three groups may be 
established to portray the Sonata-Allegro form. As the music is played, 
children not involved in the movement can be used to cue the dancers using the 
cue cards described earlier. Do not assign any specific dance steps for this 
activity. Do, however, encourage or suggest movements that best describe the 
tempo, dynamics, mood, melodic direction, etc. 

A variation of this approach would be to focus attention on the 
instrumentation instead of the music. If you choose to do this, make sure your 
children can identify the key instruments by sound. To assist them with this, 
place the names of the instruments on cards and show them at the proper time in 
the composition. 



APPROACH III 

The three "paper an pencil" activities (pp. 21-23) can be used as 
culminating activities for this listening lesson. The words used in the puzzle 
and scramble are the same and have been taken from background information which 
will have been discussed in teaching this composition. The worksheet is not a 
direct outgrowth of this composition, but can be used with any listening 
lesson. 



NICHOLAS RIMSKY-KORSAKOV (1844-1908) SCHEHERAZADE 

FOURTH MOVEMENT: FESTIVAL AT BAGHDAD; 
THE SEA; THE SHIP IS WRECKED ON A ROCK 
SURMOUNTED BY A BRONZE WARRIOR 

"Orchestration is part of the very soul of the work. A work is 
thought out in terms of the orchestra, certain tone-colors being 
inseparable from it in the mind of its creator and native to it 
from the hour of its birth." 

Rimsky-Korsakov is the father of modern orchestration, and his composi- 
tions still serve as textbooks on the use of orchestral instruments. The 
Arabian Nights was a perfect vehicle for Rimsky-Korsakov' s talents. The tales, 
also known as the Thousand Mights and a Night , are centuries old, but they took 
Europe by storm beginning in the 18th century. Travel and trade between the 
Continent and the Orient created an unquenchable thirst in Europeans for the 



25 



exoticisms of the East. This introduction to a different culture had a 
profound effect on music, architecture, painting, poetry, drama, opera, and 
even on politics. This fascination continued into the nineteenth century, and 
Scheherazade represents a musical culmination of all that had gone before. 
Rimsky-Korsakov wrote of Scheherazade in his autobiography: "All I desired was 
that the hearer, if he liked my piece as symphonic music, should carry away the 
impression that it is beyond doubt an oriental narrative of some numerous and 
varied fairy-tale wonders, and not merely four pieces played one after the 
other and composed on the basis of themes common to all four movements." 

We felt that the fourth movement of Scheherazade was the most suitable for 
performance at children's concerts because it seems to capture the essence of 
all that precedes it. Most of the themes of the work are included, and it 
contains a great variety of tempi, colors, and orchestral textures. 

Scheherazade is scored for piccolo, 2 flutes, 2 oboes, English Horn, 2 
clarinets, 2 bassoons, 4 horns, 2 trumpets, 3 trombones, tuba, timpani, 
percussion, harp, and strings. 



CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES 



BY ELEANOR NESBITT 



As a preparation for Rimsky-Korsakov ' s Scheherazade , devote some time to a 
study of the tales of A Thousand and One Arabian Nights , so that your children 
will have a concept of what the composer is describing in his music. In 
teaching this work to my classes, I first told them about Scheherazade, a girl 
who tells different tales to save her life. 



The Sultan was a ruler of a kingdom somewhere between Arabia 
and China. He loved his first wife dearly, but she betrayed him. 
Crushed and very angry, the Sultan ordered his wife put to death. 
Then he took revenge on all women. He issued a decree stating he 
would take a new wife each night and have her executed the next 
morning. For three years, the Sultan's cruel order was carried 
out. 

At last, a young woman named Scheherazade thought of a plan 
to end the daily executions. She married the Sultan. On her 
wedding night, Scheherazade began to tell her husband a tale, but 
stopped just before she reached the end. So that he could hear 
the end of the story, the Sultan let her live another day. The 
next day, she finished that tale and started another one, gaining 
herself another day of life. And so it went for a thousand and 
one nights. 

During this time, Scheherazade and the Sultan had three sons. 
He realized that she was a good and faithful wife and grew to love 
her. So he quit thinking about killing women, and they lived 
happily ever after. 

Scheherazade has four movements which have individual subtitles, but all 
four movements are similar and are bound together by two themes. The fourth 
movement is subtitled "Festival at Baghdad; The Sea; The Ship Is Wrecked on a 
Rock Surmounted by a Bronze Warrior." It opens with the statement of the two 
themes. First is what I call the Sultan's theme: 




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s 



m 



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26 



It seems to have a voice of authority and stirs up a little feeling of fear. 
Then the solo violin plays the Scheherazade theme: 

Otdenza 




mm] mrtT-*T 



The Sultan's theme is then repeated and extended as if he were demanding 
another story from his wife and reminding her what he intends to have done to 
her in the morning. Scheherazade consents as we hear her theme again by the 
solo violin. 

Then her story for that evening begins: There is a festival at Baghdad. 
The composer works with several thems which I thought suggested the many events 
going on at the festival and in the streets of Baghdad. 



Crowds of 
people 
dashing about 



flute ^ 



J j gE j iJ a J 1 J g I J J | J jj J J I J J J J 1 



Merchants 
shouting 



3* 



trumpet 



wsm 



wm 



r-w 



m 



Games and 
exhibits 



violin 



\yjao<!o 'pcSAAiTC 



s 



Then Sinbad the Sailor sets out to sea on another voyage. 



*&- 



at 



m 



T=Z 



m 



flute 



5 



y* 



m 



M 



at 



a i 



The wind picks up as he gets farther out into the ocean. A storm is 
brewing. The waves get fierce and the ship wrecks on a giant rock. Throughout 
the storm, all of the themes are passed around the orchestra as the composer 
gives different instruments an arrangement of the various themes. 



27 



-p 

c 

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en 



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en 

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28 



In conclusion, we hear the Sultan's theme again by the trombones over 
swirling sounds by the strings . The Sultan grants Scheherazade another day to 
live so he can hear what happens to the sailors and the ship. This is extended 
as if he were reminding her, "but the next morning, you will die." The 
Scheherazade theme returns as she finishes the story, and rests peacefully 
through the night. The work ends quietly as if Scheherazade knows she has 
tricked the Sultan again and her plan is a success. 

APPROACH I 

Materials : Recording, copies of the Comic Strip Call Chart 

Procedure ; After telling the class about the Arabian Nights tales, guide the 
students through a listening of the work by having the call chart to follow. 
Point out that, as in a regular comic strip, the pictures in "clouds" are 
things that are not really happening - that is Scheherazade's story for the 
Sultan. The teacher will need to listen and follow the chart several times to 
be familiar with the music and guide the students through their listening 
session. Use the theme examples to match the comic strip pictures to the 
recording. There is no definite right and wrong between each area. Children 
enjoy taking something away from special classes like music. Duplicate enough 
Comic Strips for each child to have their own to color, refer to, take home, 
etc. 

APPROACH II 

Objective ; To help the children become familiar with the main themes, the 
total orchestral suite, and the stories of the Arabian Nights . 

Materials : Sound filmstrip "Stories of Music Classes" (Scheherazade ) from Jam 
Handy School Service, film, colored pencils or markers. 

Procedure : After telling the class about the Arabian Nights tales, show the 
filmstrip. Then let the children make their own filmstrips depicting these 
tales or making up their own to go with the sound of the recording. 

DIRECTIONS FOR MAKING FILMSTRIPS: Purchase a filmstrip kit (available in any 
library supply catalog for $20 - $25.00) which includes film, guide, colored 
pencils or markers, and filmstrip cans. -OR- Obtain some old, discarded 
filmstrips from your school's media center and bleach them clean by soaking 
in a 3:2 solution of clorox and water in an old coffee can. It only takes a 
minute or two for the color to disappear. Wipe the film dry and clean. You 
will need fine-tipped permanent markers to draw and write on this type of film. 
Water based pens will smudge when touched by moist little fingers! 

Use the guide in the kit or make your own for the children to follow when 
drawing on the film. It is important to keep your drawing within the frame 
guide. Every four sprocket holes is a new filmstrip frame. Plan the drawings 
on practice paper before working on film. Practice frames should be 5/8" X 
7/8" boxes. Save 5-6 frames for a leader before you begin. Write the word 
" START" in your first frame. Keep illustrations simple. Start your drawing 
with the lightest color and finish with the darkest. Do writing or typing 
last. Write the word "END" in your last frame. Save 5-6 frames at the end for 
a trailer. Play the recording during the activity time to help cut down on 
noise and inspire ideas. 



29 



APPROACH III 

Ob j ective ; To become familiar with the tales of the Arabian Nights . 

Materials ; Arabian Nights stories (check your school media center or public 
library) , drawing paper, crayons, colored chalk, pencils, paints, etc. 



Procedure: If you are a "limited time" music teacher, read or tell one story 
while playing the recording of Scheherazade . Suggest that classroom teachers 
assist you by reading other stories to their class. Let children draw a 
picture relating to what they hear in the music or in the reading of the 
stories. Use the art work to make a Scheherazade bulletin board for your music 
classroom. A nice Oriental effect is colored chalk on black or dark 
construction paper. Spray the picture with fixative (available wherever art 
supplies are sold) to prevent smudging. 

a 

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FILMSTRIP FRAME SPACING GUIDF: 
Practice sauares 



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30 



THE SONGS 

The two songs this year were chosen by popular request. They are "This 
Land Is Your Land" and "It's A Small World." We hope they will be popular. 

"This Land Is Your Land" is one of Woody Guthrie's most popular songs. It 
can be found with teaching information and a countermelody in the Teacher 
Edition, Book 4 of Silver Burdette's Music , pages 242 and 317. It is also in 
the Teacher's Edition, Book 5 of Holt, Rinehart, and Winston's This Is Music , 
pages 162 and 230. 

"It's A Small World" can be found in Silver Burdette Teacher Edition 5, 
pages 48, 273, and 326, and Holt, Rinehart, and Winston Teacher Edition 3, page 
120. The song was written for the UNICEF exhibition at the 1964-65 World's 
Fair which was built by Walt Disney Productions. Disney wanted a song that 
conveyed the message of universal human understanding, and "It's A Small 
World" is probably the most popular of all Disney songs. It has been recorded 
in countless languages and sung by major entertainers all over the world. 

The instructions for the instrumental group are in Your North Carolina 
Symphony Book . The suggestion of instruments for "This Land Is Your Land" 
which is listed is not intended to be exhaustive. We particularly want to 
encourage young string players and hope they will be included if there are some 
in your community. Be sure to have the instrumentalists memorize their music 
so that they can keep their heads up to watch the conductor. 



BIOGRAPHIES 

MELISSA RALEY is a music education major from Meredith College with ten years 
teaching experience. She currently teaches at Underwood Elementary G/T Magnet 
in the Wake County Schools. 

JANET SCHWARZE is a native of Wisconsin and has her BM from Lawrence 
University's Conservatory of Music. She has taught for ten years and currently 
teaches K-5 music at Holt Elementary School in Durham County; she is also 
elementary music coordinator for Durham County. She is President of the 
Central Carolina Chapter of American Orf f-Schulwerk Association and is a member 
of Delta Kappa Gamma. 

MARY PELL FOSTER majored in music education at Greensboro College and has 
taught in the Rocky Mount City Schools since 1969. She has also taught at Nash 
Technical College. Ms. Foster is President of District 12, NCMEA, and is a 
member of the Central Carolina Chapter of the American Orf f-Schulwerk 
Association, the Association for the Education of Young Children, and the Rocky 
Mount Chapter of the North Carolina Symphony. 

JAN BROWNING is a graduate of the University of North Carolina at Greensboro 
and has taught in the Rocky Mount City Schools for sixteen years. She teaches 
sixth grade chorus and general music, and also teaches music classes at Nash 
Technical College. Ms. Browning has been a district director of NCMEA. 

ANTOINETTE EATTLE is a graduate of St. Augustine's College and teaches at 
Baskerville and Braswell Elementary Schools in the Rocky Mount Schools. 

JOYCE HANEY is a graduate of East Carolina University with a BS degree in music 
education. She has taught in Washington City Schools, Greensboro City Schools, 
and is a K-3 music specialist in the Pocky Mount Schools. 



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BARBARA T. FLOOD serves as a music specialist at Emma Conn G/T Magnet School in 
Wake County. Prior to coming to Wake County in 1970, she served as music 
supervisor for the Pitt County Schools. She has a BA from North Carolina 
Central University and a Master of Music Education degree from East Carolina 
University. 

ELEANOR NESBITT lives in Jamestown and teaches K-6 general music and 5th and 
6th grade chorus in the Guilford County Schools. She is a music education 
graduate of the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. 

SUZANNE NEWTON is co-author of Your North Carolina Symphony Book . She is the 
author of a number of books for young people , four of which have received the 
American Association of University Women Award, North Carolina's highest award 
for juvenile fiction. Her titles include Reubella and the Old Focus Home , M.V. 
Sexton Speaking , I_ Will Call It Georgie ' s Blues , and An End To Perfect . 

MICHELE NEWTON DOHSE is a graduate of the University of North Carolina at 
Chapel Hill where she majored in German and English. In addition to being a 
writer like her mother, Suzanne Newton, she is an enthusiastic music lover and 
singer, and also plays flute and recorder. 

JACKSON PARKHURST is Director of Education and Assistant Conductor of the North 
Carolina Symphony. He was educated at Duke University, UNC-Chapel Hill, the 
Juillard School, and Manhattan School of Music. He is co-chairman of The 
National Education Committee of the American Symphony Orchestra League. 



NOTES 

Copies of Your North Carolina Symphony Book , Teachers Handbook , and recordings 
of the music on this year's program can be purchased from the Symphony office. 
Write to The North Carolina Symphony, P.O. Box 28026, Raleigh, North Carolina 
27611 for order forms, or call (919)733-9536. 

Please place orders early enough to allow two weeks for delivery. Materials 
are available as long as supplies last; please place orders early. 

We recommend that each child own his/her own copy of Your North Carolina 
Symphony Book . 

Be sure to check other sources such as new and old editions of textbooks, the 
Bowmar recording series, and the RCA series, Adventures in Music for additional 
and related material pertaining to the music on this year's program. 

We want to thank all the music educators who contributed to this year's 
Handbook for their cooperation and enthusiasm. We welcome all comments and 
suggestions on our education program. All correspondence should be sent to: 
Jackson Parkhurst, Director of Education and Assistant Conductor, The North 
Carolina Symphony, P.O. Box 28026, Raleigh, North Carolina 27611. 



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STATE LIBRARY OF NORTH CAROLINA 



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